Health Conditions

ADHD

ADHD is a common  disorder often diagnosed in childhood and lasting into adulthood. Children with ADHD may have difficulty with attention and impulse control.

Learn More about ADHD

Allergies and Anaphylaxis

If your student has been diagnosed with a life threatening allergic reaction to a substance, you will want to immediately contact the nurse so staff can be informed and training can be conducted if necessary.

All medications to be given at school must be prescribed by a health care provider and provided by the parent/guardian.  Please have your healthcare provider complete the Allergy and Anaphylaxis Emergency Care Plan form.

If you have questions about accommodations for your student at a specific school, contact the school nurse. They will be able to answer questions and facilitate the writing of health care plans and training personnel as needed.

Learn More about Food Allergies

STOCK EPI:

In order to address severe allergic reactions and in accordance with State recommendations, epinephrine will be stocked in BVSD schools to treat first-time severe allergic reactions.

Parents are still responsible for informing the school of any known life-threatening allergies of their child, providing orders from their child’s provider, and supplying the school with emergency medication prescribed for their student.

Asthma

If your student requires medication at school, have your healthcare provider complete the Colorado Asthma Action Plan.  

If you have questions about accommodations for your student at a specific school, contact the school nurse. They will be able to answer questions and facilitate the writing of care plans and training personnel as needed.

More Information on Asthma

Autism

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder that affects communication and behavior. ASD refers to a broad range of symptoms pertaining to difficulties with communication and interactions.

Learn More about Autism

Diabetes

Information for newly diagnosed students with Diabetes or students just starting school:

Contact your school to schedule a meeting with the school nurse.  The school nurse will want to talk with you prior to school starting to gather information, review provider orders and develop a health care plan.  Also notify the school nurse of any school-sponsored, before and after school activities and programs that your child will be participating in. The school nurse will review with you what supplies are needed.

BVSD also has a Diabetes Resource Nurse available to assist families and school personnel with questions and concerns.  Contact Carrie Lee, ND, RN at: carrie.lee@bvsd.org.

Some things to consider and discuss:

  • Your child might need to be reminded to test and to have scheduled snacks - consider a timer/watch/reminder.
  • Classroom parties: Parents need a heads up to plan for extra snacks or how they will be handled.
  • Some teachers like to give candy rewards for good behavior. Discuss alternative options with your child and their teacher.
  • Teachers and students need to know how a change in activity levels (extra recess, extra strenuous P.E. or absence of recess (assemblies instead of a recess or PE) can affect blood sugar levels.
  • Make sure your child also knows what’s expected of them (depending on their age, independence, and abilities), and what their teacher and health assistant will help them with.
  • You will need to plan for field trips and other away from school activities are handled.

Learn More about Diabetes

Dietary Needs

BVSD Food Services is able to accommodate many food restrictions and other dietary needs.  For example there is a gluten free option every day in every school - every school has a salad bar that is completely gluten free. 

If your child has a food intolerance or other special dietary need such as Celiac Disease, please let your school nurse know and we will make sure the teaching and kitchen staff are aware.

Food Services Nutrition and Allergens site has information on all meals and snacks served at BVSD, you can sign up for allergen alerts here also.

Epilepsy / Seizures

If your student has been diagnosed with epilepsy or a seizure disorder, you will want to contact the nurse so staff can be informed and training conducted, if necessary. Your child may have medications, and you will want to have it available at school so that your student can be treated immediately if needed.

All medications to be given at school must be prescribed by a health care provider and provided by the parent/guardian.  Please have your healthcare provider complete the Seizure Action Plan and Medication Order form.

If you have questions about accommodations for your student at a specific school, contact the school nurse. They will be able to answer questions and facilitate the writing of care plans and training personnel as needed.

Learn More about Epilepsy

Lice

Head lice can be a nuisance but they have not been shown to spread disease. Personal hygiene or cleanliness in the home or school has nothing to do with getting head lice.

Both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Association of School Nurses advocate that "no-nit" policies (requiring a child to be free of nits before returning to school) should be discontinued for the following reasons:

  • Many nits are more than ¼ inch from the scalp. Such nits are usually not viable and very unlikely to hatch to become crawling lice, or may in fact be empty shells, also known as casings.
  • Nits are cemented to hair shafts and are very unlikely to be transferred successfully to other people.
  • The burden of unnecessary absenteeism to the students, families and communities far outweighs the risks associated with head lice.

Students diagnosed with live head lice do not need to be sent home early from school; they can go home at the end of the day, be treated, and return to class after appropriate treatment has begun. Nits may persist after treatment, but successful treatment should kill crawling lice.

Head Lice 101 - a resource for parents

More Information on Lice